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  • Samayra 1:07 am on September 14, 2017 Permalink | Reply  

    How to mentor research students? 

    Hi. I am neither a PhD nor Masters student but a PhD graduate so I don’t know if I should really be posting my query here or not. I’m a newbie to the research supervision at Cornell university where I’m given the responsibility of guiding two Masters’ students from my research area only. Because I do not have any prior experience of handling research students, I’m not confident if I would be able to answer their queries, helping out with the research process, and evaluating theses. I’ve fixed the meeting with them next week but I don’t know what shall I do, how to begin, nothing at all. University has given me a handbook of supervision of graduate students, but there is a lot of difference in reading and implementing those advices in real life. I’m anxious how to get started. Any suggestions please?

    • Caroline 10:20 am on September 15, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      As a PhD student, I am writing this answer. I hope it would help you out. I have observed my supervisor guiding me. Usually, supervisors tend to become lax and indifferent. But, mine is super passionate about research in Biomedical Sciences. All thanks to him, my research is going on successfully. So, primarily, keep tabs on your student’s’ progress. Initially, you can give them few small projects to be finished within a given time period. You need to encourage them that they should treat their Phd like any other 9 to 5 job. They should carry on with utmost diligence and commitment if they wish to make significant progress. Secondly, you can ask them to attend various national and international conferences or group seminars so that their presentation skills get honed.

    • Anna Hughes 5:18 am on September 16, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Hey! first of all, I’d wish you luck. You are right in assuming that this forum is slightly unsuitable for this question. But, fortunately you will get a first hand advice from a fellow supervisor. I currently teach at the Indiana Wesleyan University and very often supervise PhD students researching on Nursing and Public Health. I usually visit this forum 3-4 times a week so that I can get an insight into PhD students’ problems. What I have learned from my experience is that constant communication is what a PhD student craves for the most. Make sure, you provide constant support to your students. During the first year, they would be dependent upon you largely. You should not discourage that. However, after a year you should let them become independent researchers. Apart from that, for channelising their research in the right direction you can have a lot of activities like regular reading sessions where you could read published PhD dissertations. In this way, your students will get acquainted to various academic writing styles at an early stage. Also, during the third year you can make these students train the newcomers. It will enhance their knowledge and inculcate professionalism into them.

    • Lauren 9:12 am on September 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Give a little introductory task in the initial year with a particular deadline. This will help you in detecting issues and coming up with solutions to help the students understand their area of weakness. Ensure supervisee know about the professional guidelines of published work by suggesting them to read good PhD dissertation and frequently perform review literature and organising reading groups. Hope you do well in the orientation program.

    • Ryan 10:11 am on September 23, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      You can guide them by citing examples of your own experiences you faced during your PhD graduation phase. For example, make them aware about the common mistakes committed by a masters or a PhD candidate. Make your students comfortable, so that they do not hesitate in asking questions. Best of luck

  • Samayra 11:44 am on September 1, 2017 Permalink | Reply  

    How to write PhD CV? 

    Hi all. I’m a PhD student of Teaching English to Speakers of other languages (TESOL) and this year, I will graduate. Currently, I have started searching for a job of research assistant in any industry or institute. But before I approach one, I must have an influential cv which I have no idea how to prepare. Are there any formatting guidelines or something to write PhD cv? Do I need to give reference to my published research work? If yes, then how? Please advise.

    • joseph664 11:25 am on September 4, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      What actually happens is that whosoever receives your CV would skim through it. They don’t actually read it word by word. So, make sure all your strong points are highlighted. It should sufficiently draw attention. One of my friends who is M.A. in French used to put the URL of her website on top of the CV. Her website was professionally designed and developed and worked as an interactive CV. She even had a separate blog section with huge number of followers. This was highly appreciated by her hiring managers. If you too have a professionally built website of your own, then you can definitely take advantage. Here is a link https://www.360websitedesign.in/. These guys can help you with developing a website if you don’t have it and are interested in having one.

    • sierra4328 11:30 am on September 4, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      I really don't know much, but one thing I can be sure of that at this stage of your career, your CV has become an official representation of your qualifications. So, keep it formal. No need to add any extra – co -curricular activities into it. That would be considered irrelevant. If you want, do precisely mention your accomplishments in the area of your research. If there is a specific area of research which you are interested in, do mention that. As far as your published works are concerned, you should mention that. They would increase your worth exponentially. Even if you have co-authored some work, you should mention it. Don't forget – You sell yourself
      (your skills) through a CV. So, anything which increases your merit and make you stand apart from others, should be included.

    • Cynthia 3:59 am on September 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      A curriculum vitae reflects the achievements and developments in a student’s career, and therefore should be prepared with precision. When you are applying for a job, make sure your cv is updated and error free. Since you do not have any idea about how to prepare an influential cv, i will guide you in that. First of all, your cv should include your name and contact information(phone number and email address), your academic and related employment information(especially teaching, editorial), your published research work(research projects, conference papers and publications), your community service. You can also include reference list on a separate page or as part of you cv. These are some of the points you have to work upon because they an essential part of you cv. In the end, make sure your cv is impressive and appealing.

    • Jessica 7:04 am on September 6, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Greetings from my side. To prepare an effective CV, one of the most important points to remember is that there is no standard format. A decent CV is one that underscores the points that are considered to be most critical in your discipline and fits in with the standard protocol within your discipline. Make sure you highlight your strongest points on the top. For example, do mention about you published research work, about your accomplishments and achievements. Highlighting these points will give you an edge, since you have enough knowledge about it. It will be easy to prepare for the interview for those area of subjects in which you have done research. I hope i was able to answer your query and all the best.

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