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  • shellynand 6:21 am on October 3, 2017 Permalink | Reply  

    How to avoid penalty fee and submit Dissertation on time? 

    Hi all! I am a postgraduate student pursuing my PhD in Financial Forensics and topic of my research is, the financial analysis of audit report obtained from the crime related security research analysis. I am done with my research and data collection, but i am still left with the major part i.e structuring my dissertation into contents, review of literature, discussion, references etc. I have this feeling that i will not be able to complete my dissertation on time. My guide tells me if I don’t submit it on time, i will have to submit a penalty/ late submission fee. I don’t have that much amount of budget. Can anyone please suggest me a way out by which i can surpass this stage? Thank you in advance.

     
    • Jason Madgridz 6:41 am on September 24, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      For avoiding the late submissions, you need to begin with the writing part as early as you can. You can chart out a writing plan like what time suits you best for writing. If you are a morning person, writing one chapter is no big deal for you. Or if writing at home on a desk bores you or gives you stress, you can go outside- may be a park or coffee house wherever you feel comfortable to write. See, your advisor would scare you so because he wants you to complete your dissertation on time. But don’t be stressed for completing it due to deadlines because then you obviously cannot write your dissertation as you should be.

    • Deepshika Hazari 6:47 am on September 29, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Here is a good blog post written. These tips are practical and can work for you because you are about to get started with writing http://equip.sbts.edu/article/20-tips-to-help-you-finish-your-dissertation/ . If you can work out these tips, completing dissertation won’t bog you down.

  • leatriceamar 7:59 am on August 29, 2016 Permalink | Reply  

    Advice for meeting PhD deadlines 

    Never knew that time management can be an issue, until now when I am most definitely unable to meet my deadlines. My poor capabilities have led to:

    1. A pissed supervisor. He is so pissed at me right now, where he is sure I can never complete my thesis in time.

    2. A room of tensions. I cannot organise my work and there is too much to do, which is simply piling up.

    3. Sleepless nights. Not that I try, but all those research-related-tensions have left me with insomnia. It’s so bad now that I can’t concentrate on my work.

    I am in serious need of some help and advice with which I can complete my work on time and meet deadlines.

     
    • sharonbaneey1 11:42 am on August 29, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      What you lack here is planning, majorly so. I suggest that you maintain a schedule for that, like a time table, where you allot a minimum of 2 hours to your research. The following blog will give you some great tips regarding that. Hope you’ll find it useful.

      http://www.fivevidya.com/blog/work-to-rule-advice-for-meeting-a-deadline/

    • alexoliphaant 4:33 am on September 3, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Procrastination is the only reason for not meeting the deadlines and the best way to stop stalling is ‘motivation’ and ‘determination’. In my case, I was too lazy to do anything and only started doing something when I was on verge of meeting a deadline. You can imagine how it must have meant. I joined the ‘art of living course’ just for the sake of going out and I must say that it did wonders for me. I actually feel motivated and active to do my job now, you know. So be a little active, go for exercises, or start some creative course. That’ll keep you at your best. It’s important to do other activities as well.

  • sharonbaneey1 4:48 am on March 16, 2016 Permalink | Reply  

    Dissertation Discussion- How do I start this chapter? 

    Hello guys. I have been quite active on this site, but never posted any query. So, I am kind of a first-timer-thread-initiator!

    I have finished my analysis and I am just starting to write my discussion chapter. According to the universities guidelines, I need to write 8000 words of discussion. So, what does it entail? Where do I begin from?

     
    • sophiaw740 9:51 am on March 18, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Hey, 8000 words is too much, does it include conclusion? I am currently writing my discussion chapter but I only gotta write 2000 words. I am in the middle of it and so far, so good.

      Discussion is basically a method to show how your research is in alignment or contradictory to the previous researches. It’s almost like a comparison. Like, some researcher said “swine flu spreads through birds” and another said that “swine flu spreads through a particular type of bird. Now, your research can either support the two of them, or one of them or no one. So, that’s pretty much. I don’t really know that why do we have to write it. I mean, we have already written the literature review and the findings. This chapter just merges them.

    • alexoliphaant 5:39 am on March 23, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I am currently writing my literature review, which is taking a lot of time. All I know about discussion is that you need to show your results backing up with literature. @Sophiaw740 Can you refer any book or some resource?

    • sophiaw740 12:44 pm on April 14, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      I found this PPT on a website regarding discussion chapter. It describes what this chapter entails and how to write conclusion too. I have shared the link below, hope it’s of some use.

      http://www.resourcesvalley.com/discuss-your-dissertation-or-thesis/

    • sharonbaneey1 10:40 am on April 18, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      @Sophiaw740 I went through the PPT and it has given me quite an idea about the discussion chapter. Thanks.

    • sharonbaneey1 9:31 am on May 17, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Hey guys, I have another doubt regarding the same issue. As I have started this chapter, I am understanding the meaning behind it. And I wanted to know that do I just have to agree or disagree with other researchers?

    • dolliejgandy 10:49 am on June 28, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Your question is rather confusing. How about you read this post on how to deal with a discussion chapter:

      http://www.dissertationtutors.co.uk/blog/dissertation-discussion-the-horror/

      And if still you don’t understand, then you can converse with a tutor from the same, above site. A subject expert will be more useful for that matter.

    • terrywellch 12:06 pm on June 30, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Discussion basically elaborates on the analysis section of a study, with a relevant connection to the literature, you know, like a back-up type. You gotta show that your research has some value to the literature. A discussion is a way to do exactly that.

  • Dr S Loretti 8:00 am on February 1, 2015 Permalink | Reply  

    What is a “bad” thesis? 

    If you thesis has any of these elements, its probably a bad one and you are most likely to face rejection.

    1. A repetition of previously presented work.

    2. Inadequate or vague theoretical framework.

    3. A conclusion inconsistent with the introduction or vice-verse.

    4. Largely descriptive implying only a mere data collection exercise.

    5. A confused methodology.

    6. Absence of confidence and assurance in writing.

    7. A clumsy presentation.

    Absolutely avoid all of these to save yourself from rejection!

     

     

     
    • Cindy 5:30 am on February 2, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      My supervisor keeps telling me i lack expression in writing. How do i improve my writing? please help. I do not want my thesis to be rejected!

  • Michael 4:55 am on September 27, 2014 Permalink | Reply  

    How to write the Abstract? 

    Since an abstract is a summary of the whole research, it is important to cover all the details about it.
    Paragraph 1. What is the problem?
    Not more then 3-4 lines should be written about the problem to tell the readers about it clearly.

    Paragraph 2. Why is the problem hard?
    – What has eluded us solving it?
    – What does the literature says about it?
    – What are the obstacles/challenges?

    Paragraph 3 What is your approach to solve it?
    – How come you solved it?
    – Write about the claims that your thesis plans to improve or demonstrate.

    Paragraph 4. What is the consequence of your approach?

    – Tell them about the impacts.
    – What does your approach/result enable?

     
  • morry1 4:25 am on September 25, 2014 Permalink | Reply  

    Tips on writing a good proposal 

    Below are some tips which can help you get your thesis proposal selected in the first go-
    1. Always remember that the main purpose of writing a proposal is to convince your guide.
    2. Your proposal should look like that you have done enough research about the topic and really want to start with the next step. Though you need not mention each and everything you found in the proposal.
    3. You must mention the outcomes and shortcomings of the previous research and also why do you want to start with this topic
    4. It should convince the reader that you’ll be able to formulate a testable hypothesis and test it in a planned manner.

     
    • kelly 12:17 pm on November 14, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      Hey Morry
      Thanks for this post. I am really confused as to what all should i mention in the proposal. Do i need to include a detailed literature review? because if i don’t, will the research gap be justified? Also, my guide says i must mention the research methodology in the proposal. What if i am not able to gather the targeted data from the primary sources? Is it okay to modify the methodology once it is approved?

  • Rosaline 4:53 am on September 21, 2014 Permalink | Reply  

    What is a great PhD Dissertation? 

    First thing which should be kept in mind while opting for research is that the area and the topic you’ll choose should vast and it should open doors for future research.
    It should always leave an impact on the readers and the evaluators. They should get a question in their minds that, “When will somebody else will pick this topic of research?”
    It should also give an impact that the research has really changed a few things or the problem you chose, really need to be solved. Try to end your research with a question mark so the people look forward to more.
    In case your topic is too technical then you should try to make it a little accessible and understandable to others.. Keeping in mind all these points will surely help you get a great dissertation.

     
  • Lucy Watson 9:56 am on September 16, 2014 Permalink | Reply  

    How to write a Dissertation Proposal 

    Dissertation proposal writing is the second step after topic selection. If you are lucky enough that your guide approved the topic of your choice in the first go, then you really need to work hard on preparing a very impressive proposal to get it also approved so that you can start with the research work.. A good proposal shoul answer the following questions –

    • What is the problem issue you are going to work on?
    • Why do you thik it is a problem?
    • Why is it improtant to address it?
    • Why do you want to look for answers and solutions?
    • Why did you choose that problem?

     
  • Dr S Loretti 4:01 am on May 31, 2014 Permalink | Reply  

    The Iterative Research Process 

    The ultimate key to a successful doctorate research lies in its ‘iterative’ process. The process involves returning to the research objectives, questions and methods over and over again while devising new ideas and improvements. A research is often considered to be a systematic process with stages occurring one-by-one, but it must be fluid and adaptable to change.

    It is often seen that post discussions with the supervisors and peers, the need for alterations in the research methodologies, or addition of a new research question or some other changes is projected. Throughout the process of dissertation writing, the study is re-examined from different perspectives which may call for a transformation of the research to a      different shape. To ensure a comprehensive approach to the research problem, it is essential to realize that the process of research is cyclical.

     
  • Dr S Loretti 3:57 am on May 31, 2014 Permalink | Reply  

    Common Errors in Proposal Writing 

    Most students fail to understand the underlying purpose and significance of a research proposal. A research would be sought to be good only if its proposal reaches the deemed level of quality.

    Following are some common mistakes that research candidates make while preparing for proposal writing:

    • Improper use of context to frame the research question
    • Inability to define the boundary limits for research
    • Failure to cite suitable literatures
    • Inaccurate presentation of empirical contributions by other researchers
    • Diversion from the research question
    • Inappropriate detailing on major issues and arguments
    • Absence of clearly defines directions
    • Lapse in source citation and references
    • Failing to abide by the writing style guidelines
    • Sloppy writing
     
    • Fidel N. Cooney 6:42 am on August 11, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      Inaccurate presentation is what I’m struggling with these days.

    • Teresa J. Mann 5:07 am on September 29, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      Hey just came across this at thr right time. Will surely cross check my proposal with these tips.

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